Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts published in “Pay Period”

Now That The Employee Has Separated, When is Their Final Check Due?

0

With the exception of four states (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Mississippi), each state has specific laws regarding the issuance of a final paycheck to a separated employee.  Many states differentiate whether the employee was separated voluntarily or involuntarily, and the timing ranges from “immediately” (yes, this means the same day the employee is terminated) to the next scheduled payday, so I have put together this table for quick and easy reference. Each state has penalties for violation of the final check rule, so be sure you know what is required.    A state such as California will enforce the employer to…

Pay Frequency – Timing Matters

0

To pay Weekly or Biweekly (or some other frequency), that is the question. The US Department of Labor (DOL) does not specify any sort of frequency in which employees should be paid minimum wages or the overtime compensation it calls for.  Instead the language states that “Wages required by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) are due on the regular payday for the pay period covered.”  While this seems vague, the DOL takes this principal seriously.  For example, if an employee fails to record time worked or submit a timesheet, and the employer is aware that work was performed, the…

Going Paperless

0

Going paperless.  Some do it to save the environment, some do it to save money, and some do it to save time.  No matter what the reason, there are some things to consider when it comes to the payroll process and the payroll check. While the “check” itself becomes obsolete as many individuals go on direct deposit, it is always attached to a check stub, or as we call it, a pay statement, a detail of the employee’s wages, deductions withheld, taxes withheld, and sometimes other important information.  According to the United States Department of Labor, the Fair Labor Standards Act…

The phenomenon of 27 Biweekly payrolls or 53 Weekly payrolls in a year

0

There is a phenomenon that can occur about once every 5 to 11 years, depending upon whether you pay your employees weekly or biweekly.  It is that instance of an extra pay day within the calendar year.  For many companies, we find that it passes without a second thought, but should it? First off, why does it happen?  The root of the problem is that 365 days in the year is not divisible by a 7 day work week.  There is a remainder, and over time, that remainder will add up to a whole number, thus another pay period. 365…