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Posts published in “Minimum Wage”

Calculating Overtime Properly

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Overtime. It is a subject that you may think you know well, but do you? It is not always a simple matter of paying the employee “time and a half” for any hours worked in excess of 40 hours in a workweek. There is much more to take into consideration, and while this article is not intended to cover every scenario out there, we will touch a number of bases. What we will not cover, this time around, is who may be exempt from overtime. Let’s start with the federal law, where the overtime provisions are contained in the Fair…

State Minimum Wage Increases 2022

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While the Federal minimum wage remains at $7.25 per hour, 27 states and many cities, counties and locals have set increases effective January 1st, 2022 with a few announcing a change during 2022.  Many states continue their path to $15.00 per hour and you will now find places in Washington state that have a minimum wage over $17.00 per hour.  A list of each state/local, along with the new hourly rate is listed below. Any state that does not have a minimum wage change scheduled is not listed. All rates are effective January 1st, 2022 unless otherwise noted. Alaska: $10.34 Arizona: $12.80…

Restaurants and Businesses with Tipped Employees – New Minimum Wage Rule Takes Effect

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On October 28, 2021, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued a Final Rule, which takes effect on December 28, 2021; it is extremely important for businesses that pay the lower “tipped minimum wage” to take notice. In this final rule, the DOL finalizes its proposal to withdraw one portion of the Tip Regulations Under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA 2020 Tip Final Rule) and finalize its proposed revisions related to the determination of when a tipped employee is employed in dual jobs under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938. Specifically, the Department of Labor is amending its…

State Minimum Wage Increases 2021

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While the Federal minimum wage remains at $7.25 per hour, many states and cities/locals have set increases effective January 1st, 2021 with a few announcing a change during 2021.  With the addition of Florida, there are now 8 states on their way, or at $15.00 per hour.  A list of each state/local, along with the new hourly rate is listed below; All rates are effective January 1st, 2021 unless otherwise noted. Alaska: $10.34 Arizona: $12.15 ($9.15 for tipped employees-$3 less than minimum wage) Arkansas: $11.00 (tipped minimum wage will remain at $2.63) California: $14.00 for businesses with 26 or more…

State Minimum Wage Increases 2020

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While the Federal minimum wage remains at $7.25 per hour,many states and cities/locals have set increases effective January 1st, 2020 with a few announcing a change during 2020, and New York with a December 31st, 2019 increase.  A list of each state/local, along with the new hourly rate is listed below; All rates are effective January 1st, 2020 unless otherwise noted. Alaska: $10.19 Arizona: $12.00 ($9.00 for tipped employees) Arkansas: $10.00 (tipped minimum wage will remain at $2.63) California: $13.00 for businesses with 26 or more employees, and $12.00 for 25 or less; Cities marked with an * below will…

Compensable and Non-compensable Travel Time. Do You Know?

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There are many times when an employee may need to travel for business-related purposes. The latter span can include something brief, like a trip to the bank, or a cross-country flight for a business conference and depending upon the circumstances, it can be compensable time. I think the best way to tackle this is to take a look at examples as to what is and what is not: What is NOT compensable Home to work/Work to home (aka commuting) – An employee who travels from home before the regular workday and returns to his/her home at the end of the…

State Minimum Wage Increases 2019

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While the Federal minimum wage remains at $7.25 per hour, 22 states and many cities/locals have set increases effective January 1st, 2018 with a few announcing a July 1st, 2019 increase, and New York with a December 31st, 2018 increase.  A list of each state/local, along with the new hourly rate is listed below; All rates are effective January 1st, 2019 unless otherwise noted. Alaska: $9.89 an hour Arizona: $11.00 Flagstaff: $12.00 Arkasnsas: $9.25 California: $12.00 for businesses with 26 or more employees; $11.00 for businesses with 25 or fewer employees Alameda: $13.50 Belmont: $13.50 Cupertino: $15.00 El Cerrito: $15.00 Los Altos: $15.00 Los Angeles: (7/1/2019) $14.25 for businesses with 26 or more employees;…

Tipping – A Fictitious City in China and Maybe on Its Way Out Here

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This past week, voters in Washington, D.C. elected to raise the minimum wage for tipped workers to minimum wage by passing Initiative 77.  Wait aren’t they already receiving minimum wage?  Sort of.  While the federal minimum wage is $7.25 per hour, the minimum wage for an employee who receives at least $30 per month in tips is only $2.13 an hour.   This does not mean that an employee who works a 40 hour week is only going home with less than $100 gross.  The employee is expected to receive tips that bring them up to the regular minimum wage, and should that…

State Minimum Wage Increases 2018

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While the Federal minimum wage remains at $7.25 per hour, 18 states and many cities/locals have set increases effective January 1st, 2018.   A list of each state/local, along with the new hourly rate, and a link to the states determination letter or web page is listed below; Alaska: $9.84 an hour Albuquerque, New Mexico: $8.95 Arizona: $10.50 Bernalillo County, New Mexico: $8.85 California: $11.00 for businesses with 26 or more employees; $10.50 for businesses with 25 or fewer employees Colorado: $10.20 Cupertino, California: $13.50 El Cerrito, California: $13.60 Flagstaff, Arizona: $11.00 Florida: $8.25 Hawaii: $10.10 Los Altos, California: $13.50 Maine: $10.00 Michigan: $9.25 Milpitas, California: $12.00 Minneapolis, Minnesota: $10.00 for businesses with more than 100 employees Minnesota: $9.65 for businesses with…

Waiting to be Engaged, or Engaged to Wait?

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Not knowing the difference could result in a costly Department of Labor claim.  Maybe more costly than a divorce. If your employee is Engaged to Wait then that time is considered hours worked.  Conversely, Waiting to be Engaged are off-the-clock hours, thus not hours worked or compensable under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). So what is the difference between the two?  I am glad you asked. Engaged to Wait is time spent primarily for the benefit of the employer, and how much restraint is placed on an employee who is waiting.   Let’s look at a few examples to…